Diana, Princess of Wales

AKA:
Lady Di, the People's Princess
Birth Name:
Diana Frances Spencer
Birth Date:
July 1, 1997
Birth Place:
Sandringham, Norfolk, England
Death Date:
August 31, 1997
Place of Death:
Pitié-Salpêtrière Hospital, 47-83 Boulevard de l'Hôpital, 75013 Paris, France
Age:
36
Cause of Death:
Fatal chest injures from car crash
Cemetery Name:
Althorp Estate
Claim to Fame:
Historical Figure
Diana, Princess of Wales was a member of the British royal family. She was the first wife of Charles, Prince of Wales and was the mother of Prince William and Prince Harry. She was international icon and earned her enduring popularity as well as unprecedented public scrutiny, exacerbated by her tumultuous private life. Her marriage to Prince Charles was unhappy and broken as he continued on an affair with Camilla Parker Bowles. She used her popularity to promote charity work centered on children, but she later became known for her involvement with AIDS patients and campaign for the removal of landmines. She also raised awareness and advocated ways to help people affected with cancer and mental illness. Diana died from injures sustained in a car crash in Paris in 1997, while trying to escape paparazzi. This led to extensive public mourning and media attention worldwide.

Fun Fact

Prince Charles has never actually visited the gravesite of his former wife.

Cemetery Information:

Final Resting Place:

Althorp Estate

Althorp, Northampton, NN7 4HG

United Kingdom

Europe

Grave Location:

The Oval Lake

Grave Location Description

Enter through the entrance of Althorp and park in the parking area. Follow the path behind the Althorp house heading north east to the white Memorial. Diana’s resting place is about 227 feet northeast of her Memorial on the Althorp Estate. Diana’s actual final resting place is set away from the public, on the small island in the lake called The Oval Lake.

Grave Location GPS

52.283109, -1.000225

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