WARNING: EXPLICIT MATERIAL

Violette Nozière

Birth Name:
Violette Germaine Nozière
Birth Date:
January 11, 1915
Birth Place:
Neuvy-sur-Loire, France
Death Date:
November 26, 1966
Place of Death:
Le Petit-Quevilly, France
Age:
51
Cause of Death:
Unknown
Cemetery Name:
Neuvy-sur-Loire communal cemetery
Claim to Fame:
Crime and their Victims
Violette Nozière was a French woman who was convicted of murdering her father. Known as "L'Affaire" the trial had everything to captivate all of France in the 1930s - parracide, incest, prostitution, syphilis. Given all the lies and stories Violette stated during the trial and her complete silence after her release from prison we will never truly know what happened in the small apartment on the 3rd floor of 9 Rue de Madagascar one steamy, hot August night.

On a hot, humid August evening in 1933, in a working-class neighborhood in Paris, eighteen-year-old Violette Nozière gave her mother and father glasses of barbiturate-laced “medication,” which she told them had been prescribed by the family doctor; her father died while the mother barely survived. Almost immediately Violette’s act of “double parricide” became the most sensational private crime of the French interwar era—discussed and debated so passionately that it was compared to the Dreyfus Affair. Why would the beloved only child of respectable parents do such a thing?

In the end she was found guilty, sentenced to death. Then the sentenced was commuted to life at hard labor … then down to 12 years … then finally released from prison in 1945.

Cemetery Information:

Final Resting Place:

Neuvy-sur-Loire communal cemetery

intersection of Rue du Coudray and Chemin du Colombier

Neuvy-sur-Loire, , 58450

France

Europe

Grave Location Description

Violette Nozière can be found resting at the communal cemetery of Neuvy-sur-Loire in the Bourgogne region in France. From the entry gates walk towards the center of the small cemetery. Now continue to walk to the back wall and her family grave can be found approximately 8 spaces from the back of the cemetery.

Grave Location GPS

47.525275, 2.890656

Visiting The Grave:

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