Charles Atlas

Birth Name:
Angelo Siciliano
Birth Date:
October 30, 1892
Birth Place:
Acri, Cosenza, Italy
Death Date:
December 24, 1972
Place of Death:
Long Beach, New York
Age:
80
Cause of Death:
Heart attack
Cemetery Name:
St. John Cemetery
Claim to Fame:
The Odd and the Interesting
Charles Atlas was an Italian-born American bodybuilder best remembered as the developer of a bodybuilding method and its associated exercise program which spawned a landmark advertising campaign featuring his name and likeness; it has been described as one of the longest-lasting and most memorable ad campaigns of all time.

Cemetery Information:

Final Resting Place:

St. John Cemetery

80-01 Metropolitan Avenue

Middle Village, New York, 11379

USA

North America

Map:

Grave Location:

St. John Cloister, Unit 5, Floor 3, Section 1

Grave Location Description

Charles Atlas is located in the St. John’s Cloister which is in the middle of the cemetery. After entering through the west main entrance, take the first left to head northeast. Then turn right at the intersection, and continue along this road. Head straight at the next intersection to head northeast. You will see the buildings as you approach. Charles Atlas has a marble nameplate on a marble wall.

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Lawnchair Larry

popular name: Lawnchair Larry

date_of_death: October 6, 1993

age: 44

cause_of_death: Suicide - Gunshot to heart

claim_to_fame: The Odd and the Interesting

best_know_for: Lawnchair Larry was an American truck driver who made a 45-minute flight in a homemade airship made of an ordinary patio chair and 45 helium-filled weather balloons. The aircraft, named 'Inspiration I', and with a couple of sandwiches, a bottle of Coke, a radio transmitter and a BB gun, rose to an altitude of over approximately 15,000 feet (4,600 m). Lawnchair Larry floated from the point of takeoff in San Pedro, California, into and violating controlled airspace near Long Beach Airport. Armed with a couple of sandwiches, a bottle of Coke, a radio transmitter and a BB gun,During the landing, the aircraft became entangled in power lines, but Walters was able to safely climb down. The flight attracted worldwide media attention and inspired a later movie and imitators. Lawnchair Larry was awarded the title of "At-Risk Survivor" in the 1993 Darwin Awards.

Florence Bernardin Rees

popular name: Florence Bernardin Rees

date_of_death: February 7, 1862

age: 2

cause_of_death: Scarlet Fever

claim_to_fame: The Odd and the Interesting

best_know_for: In 1862 two-year-old Bernardine died from Scarlet Fever and her grave is often found adorned with trinkets, toys, rings, flowers, and stones. But what makes Bernardine's final resting place such a tourist draw is that it is guarded by a black iron dog. How did it get there? Before the Civil War, the Richmond dog stood at a storefront of photographer Charles R. Rees (whose name is on the cemetery plot). Children loved the dog and his young niece was no exception. When his niece contracted Scarlet Fever and passed away (that area of the cemetery is loaded with plots of young children who passed in similar fashion) Charles had the statue moved to her grave as a tribute. Today the Iron Dog (aka the Black Dog) is one of the most visited gravesites in Hollywood Cemetery.

Charles Blondin

popular name: Charles Blondin

date_of_death: February 22, 1897

age: 72

cause_of_death: Diabetes

claim_to_fame: The Odd and the Interesting

best_know_for: Charles Blondin was a French tightrope walker and acrobat. During the winter of 1858, a 34-year-old French acrobat traveled to Niagara Falls hoping to become the first person to cross the “boiling cataract.” Noting the masses of ice and snow on either bank and the violent whirls of wind circling the gorge, Blondin delayed the grand event until he would have better weather. He always worked without a net, believing that preparing for disaster only made one more likely to occur. Known for his numerous crossings of the 1,100 ft (340 m) Niagara Gorge on a tightrope, he added a touch of showmanship - once stopping midway to cook an omelette and once carrying his manager on his back. Believe it or not, he died in bed at the ripe age of 72.

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